Pine Bluffs Post - Serving all of Eastern Laramie County since 1908

Still time to be counted in the 2017 Census of Agriculture

 

For the Pine Bluffs Post

CHEYENNE, WYOMING – February 27, 2018 – Wyoming farmers, ranchers, land owners, and others who

received a form still have time to be counted in the 2017 Census of Agriculture, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). Although the first deadline has just passed, NASS will continue to accept Census information through the spring to get a complete and accurate picture of American agriculture that represents all farmers and ranchers in all counties.

"We thank everyone who has completed their Census to date. Wyoming currently has a return rate of 43

percent of the 16,100 Census questionnaires mailed last fall," said Rhonda Brandt, Wyoming State Statistician.

"Park, Crook, and Platte Counties have the highest response so far, all nearing 50%, while Big Horn, Campbell,

Carbon, Sublette, and Uinta Counties have below 40% of their forms returned. County Commissioners, Economic

Development Committees, Extension Educators, and many other county, state, and national officials rely on

accurate county-level data to make sound decisions and improve the economy in Wyoming. Even if you only have one or two head of livestock on the outside of town, you use inputs and are a potential market. Farmers, ranchers, and agribusinesses lose the opportunity to sell to you if they do not know you are there."

Federal law mandates that everyone who received the 2017 Census of Agriculture questionnaire complete

and return it even if not currently farming. NASS will continue to follow-up with producers through the spring with mailings, phone calls, and personal visits. To avoid these additional contacts, farmers and ranchers are encouraged to complete their Census either online at http://www.agcounts.usda.gov or by mail as soon as possible. Responding online saves time by skipping sections that do not apply and automatically calculating totals. The online questionnaire is accessible on desktops, laptops, and mobile devices.

Brandt says "I receive many requests for county-level Wyoming agricultural data that I would not be able

to answer without the Census of Agriculture. A few of the recent requests include: a married couple, who are both cattle veterinarians, wanted to relocate from California to Wyoming and needed to know the most densely

populated cattle counties where they could set up a practice; the Wyoming Ag in the Classroom staff requested

agriculture data going back to 1890 to make Wyoming lesson plans with agriculture examples; and a young

ranching couple wanted cost of production expenses for nearby counties so they could compare the averages with their operation, increase profits, and hopefully stay in business. Land values are one of the most requested data items. As farms and ranches pass from one generation to the next, there is a need to know the increase in value of that land. Without responses from every county, succession planning would be much more difficult."

For more information about the 2017 Census of Agriculture, visit http://www.agcensus.usda.gov. For questions or assistance filling out the Census, call toll-free (888) 424-7828. NASS to follow-up with Wyoming farmers and ranchers who have not yet responded

 

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